The Slow Homes Manifesto (Part One)

I recently drove through Lakewood, a city 10 miles south of Los Angeles, just to see for myself what it looked like. Lakewood is the quintessential “fast homes” community—the housing equivalent of a fast-food order of “17,500 happy meals to go, please.”

In 1950, the Lakewood Park Company began building homes at the rate of 50 per day. They did not stop until 17,500 single family homes blanketed the former sugar beet fields, leaving little sign of the lakes or woods you'd expect to see in a place named “Lakewood.”

As I recall, Lakewood now looks more or less like this:

CSA + CSK = Delicious Opportunity

I'm guessing you've heard of Community Supported Agriculture (CSAs).  Well, there's a new acronym on the block - CSK, for Community Supported Kitchen. CSK's use a similar community-support model to deliver prepared meals using CSA products.  Sweet Deliverance, the community enterprise featured in the video, is one of a handful of CSKs that have cropped up recently.

5 Ways My Son Benefits from a Carfree Life

I was at the playground talking with some moms.

"I could never ride the bus!" said one. "They're so dirty and crowded."

"Taking the bus with a baby?" sniffed another. "That's just child abuse!"

I hate to think what they would have said about my family, had they known our terrible secret: On the second day of my son's life, we took him on a bus to see his doctor.

How to Be a Carfree Family

Tired of paying car insurance, sitting in traffic jams, and guzzling too much gas? Do you never want to dig your car out of another snowstorm?

Perhaps your family already cut down from two cars to one, but taking the carfree step seems impossible. Maybe you loved your carfree life back before you had kids, and every time you wrestle the kids into their carseats or take the car to the shop you pine for the old days.

How to Drive Your Car with an iPhone

From Waterloo Labs, "DIY projects deep in the heart of Texas." This video's relevance to Shareable.net's editorial mission is debatable, but there are several shareable things I love about it: 1) the obvious joy these guys take in collaboration; 2) the subversive way they hack the car, an iPhone, and numerous other devices to make unrelated machines talk to each other; and 3) their use of YouTube to spread the word and encourage other people to "try this at home." Bottom line: This is kewl. 

Our Best Future: A Q&A with Robin Chase

This year, Time magazine named Zipcar co-founder and transportation consultant Robin Chase as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Credit: Tanit Sakakini, Time magazine.
This year, Time magazine named Zipcar co-founder and transportation consultant Robin Chase as one of the 100 most influential people in the world. Credit: Tanit Sakakini, Time magazine.
When Robin Chase co-founded Zipcar in 2000 using German and Swiss carsharing companies as models, many observers said that sharing cars would never take off in America. Chase and her partners proved them wrong: within two years, the company had expanded from Cambridge, MA (where Chase still lives with her husband and three children) to Washington, DC, and New York City.

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